Keynote Speakers

Keynote Speakers

All what is good to know

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Athanasios Chasiotis

IMPLICIT MOTIVES ACROSS CULTURES (with Jan Hofer)

Athanasios Chasiotis's research covers developmental, cross-cultural, motivational, personality, and evolutionary life-span psychology. He employs qualitative and quantitative methodological approaches, including naturalistic observations, discourse analysis, experimental protocols, and quantitative statistical analyses as he strongly believes that we should be flexible in the choice of methods and that such a choice should be derived from research questions. His collaborators and he explained cultural variance by verifying a number of culture-independent relations between childhood context variables and implicit and explicit psychological measures in the preschool period as well as in adulthood. They identified specific relations between explicit and implicit developmental measures of self-regulatory and mentalistic abilities across cultures and universal developmental pathways in which childhood context variables are related to somatic and psychological development.

Gail Marcia Ferguson, Human and Community Development, HCD, College of Agricultural Consumer and Environmental Sciences, ACES
gmfergus@illinois.edu
Assistant Professor
2015 DCH
M/C 081
(217) 300-0365

Gail M. Ferguson

REMOTE ACCULTURATION, REMOTE ENCULTURATION, AND OTHER ALTERNATIONS IN CULTURAL TRANSMISSION

Dr. Gail Ferguson is an Associate Professor in the Institute of Child Development at the University of Minnesota. Her research focuses on modern forms of cultural transmission among youth/families (e.g., remote acculturation and remote enculturation), which are facilitated by 21st Century globalization avenues such as media and migration. A 2016 American Psychological Association Outstanding Early Career Psychologist, Gail publishes in JCCP and IJIR as well as developmental and regional journals. She has also co-authored chapters in the Cambridge and Oxford Acculturation Handbooks. She has been an IACCP member for 7+ years and considers IACCP a professional home.

Jan Hofer

Jan Hofer​

IMPLICIT MOTIVES ACROSS CULTURES (with Athanasios Chasiotis)

Jan Hofer has studied psychology at Friedrich-Alexander University in Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany. He received his Ph.D. from the same university (2000) writing his thesis on adolescent development in Zambia. From 2006 to 2011, he has been a member of the research group “Cross-cultural Life-span Psychology” at the University of Osnabrück. Since October 2011, he is head of Department of Developmental Psychology at Trier University. Main topics in his research and publications are cross-cultural differences and similarities in developmental processes across the life span, particularly by considering effects of implicit motives on individuals’ mind and behavior. He is collaborating with colleagues in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, Central America, and Europe.

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Jozefien De Leersnyder

THE CULTURAL AND RELATIONAL DYNAMICS OF EMOTION: FROM CULTURAL VARIATION TO INTERCULTURAL CONTACT (with Michael Boiger)

Jozefien De Leersnyder is a tenure-track Research Professor at the Center for Social and Cultural Psychology (CSCP) at KU Leuven, Belgium. Previously, she worked as a tenured Assistant Professor at the University of Amsterdam and as a post-doc at the CSCP, where she also obtained her PhD in 2014. Her research focuses on the interplay between culture, psyche and well-being, particularly in changing and diverse social worlds. In her work, she describes the phenomenon of emotional acculturation – i.e., the changes in people’s emotional life due to contact with another socio-cultural context – as well as the micro-processes that instigate emotional similarity and mutual understanding in intercultural interactions. Building on these insights, Jozefien is now developing and empirically testing a cultural psychological account of acculturation in which not only people’s explicit cultural affiliations, like identities and attitudes, change due to cultural contact, but also their more implicit cultural affiliations, like their ways of thinking, feeling and acting.

Michael Boiger

Michael Boiger

THE CULTURAL AND RELATIONAL DYNAMICS OF EMOTION: FROM CULTURAL VARIATION TO INTERCULTURAL CONTACT (with Jozefien De Leersnyder)

Michael Boiger is an assistant professor at the University of Amsterdam. He obtained his PhD from the University of Leuven (Belgium) in 2013 and is a former recipient of the Harry and Pola Triandis Dissertation Award. Michael conducted his doctoral research on the cultural construction of anger and shame in the United States, Japan, Belgium, and Turkey. In his current research, he takes a cultural psychological approach to studying emotional dynamics in close relationships. In particular, he is interested in how intercultural couples navigate cultural differences in emotion. Besides his academic activities, Michael works as an emotion-focused and systemic therapist in private practice.

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Michael H. Bond

FROM MY PAST TO OUR PRESENT IN CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY: A SUMMING UP AND FUTURESCAPE

I fell in love with being a cross-cultural psychologist when I lived and worked in Japan for three years while teaching personality. This love affair has continued over my subsequent 46 years as an academic practicing in Hong Kong. During that time, I have written extensively in academic journals and edited collections on a wide variety of social psychological topics, edited books of essays in Chinese psychology, including The Oxford Handbook of Chinese Psychology (2010), and written on cultural differences in cognition, emotions, and behavior, most recently as a co-author of Understanding Social Psychology across Cultures (Sage, 2013). At this stage of my life and career, I am trying to understand why I have taken this pathway through my life, to make sense of my development as a cross-cultural psychologist, and to anticipate a probable and useful direction for IACCP members and interested colleagues to take in their professional work. This keynote address presented at IACCP, 2020 conveys my recent thinking on these matters.

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Sylvie Graf

THE ROLE OF MASS COMMUNICATION IN SHAPING ATTITUDES TOWARD SOCIAL MINORITIES

Sylvie Graf is a leading senior researcher at the Institute of Psychology, Czech Academy of Sciences, where she founded and leads the Brno Lab of Intergroup Processes. Her main research interest relates to improving relations between social groups – through intergroup contact, mass media exposure, and careful use of language describing people in intergroup context. Dr Graf’s work originally combines different theoretical perspectives (social psychology, personality psychology, media and communication studies, political science), using varied methodological approaches (cross-sectional, experimental, longitudinal and qualitative data analysis) in diverse cultural contexts (multi-national studies, Czech Republic, Switzerland, post-conflict societies).​

https://news.virginia.edu/content/rice-theory-explains-north-south-china-cultural-differences-study-shows

Thomas Talhelm

THOMAS TALHELM is an Associate Professor of Behavioral Science at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. Thomas has lived in China for six years as a Princeton in Asia fellow, as a freelance journalist, and a Fulbright scholar. He researches how rice farming made southern China more interdependent than the more freewheeling, wheat-growing north including what that means for whether people move chairs in Starbucks. He speaks Chinese and enough Hindi to ask questions but not understand the answers. While in China, Thomas founded Smart Air, a social enterprise that makes low-cost DIY air purifiers to help people protect themselves from air pollution. 

ENJOY OLOMOUC

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